One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter
For readers of Mindy Kaling, Jenny Lawson and Roxane Gay, a debut collection of fierce and funny essays about growing up the daughter of Indian immigrants in Canada, "a land of ice and casual racism," by the irreverent, hilarious cultural observer and incomparable rising star, Scaachi Koul.In One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter, Scaachi deploys her razor-sharp humour to share her fears, outrages and mortifying experiences as an outsider growing up in Canada. Her subjects range from shaving her knuckles in grade school, to a shopping trip gone horribly awry, to dealing with internet trolls, to feeling out of place at an Indian wedding (as an Indian woman), to parsing the trajectory of fears and anxieties that pressed upon her immigrant parents and bled down a generation. Alongside these personal stories are pointed observations about life as a woman of colour, where every aspect of her appearance is open for critique, derision or outright scorn. Where strict gender rules bind in both Western and Indian cultures, forcing her to confront questions about gender dynamics, racial tensions, ethnic stereotypes and her father's creeping mortality--all as she tries to find her feet in the world.With a clear eye and biting wit, Scaachi Koul explores the absurdity of a life steeped in misery. And through these intimate, wise and laugh-out-loud funny dispatches, a portrait of a bright new literary voice emerges.

One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter Details

TitleOne Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 7th, 2017
PublisherDoubleday Canada
ISBN0385685351
ISBN-139780385685351
Number of pages288 pages
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Writing, Essays, Autobiography, Memoir, Short Stories, Biography, Cultural, Canada, Humor, Feminism, Biography Memoir

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One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter Review

  • Natalie
    March 8, 2017
    Any writer promised to bear similarities to either Mindy Kaling or Roxane Gay will have my immediate interest in the palm of their hand. And Scaachi Koul did not dissaopint with her wry humor and telling insights on a plethora of subjects. Dealing with fear, anxiety, grief, parenting, insecurities, racial discrimination, racial advantage, shadism, white privilege, sexism, feminism, online harassment, sexual harassment, diversity in media, and so much more. Koul won my heart over almost instantly Any writer promised to bear similarities to either Mindy Kaling or Roxane Gay will have my immediate interest in the palm of their hand. And Scaachi Koul did not dissaopint with her wry humor and telling insights on a plethora of subjects. Dealing with fear, anxiety, grief, parenting, insecurities, racial discrimination, racial advantage, shadism, white privilege, sexism, feminism, online harassment, sexual harassment, diversity in media, and so much more. Koul won my heart over almost instantly with her essays. SourceBut most of all, I knew I was a goner when she talked about her family. Getting to read about a small piece of her Kashmiri family history was intoxicating. I wanted more and more and more. Her parents remain two of the most caring and daring ones I've had the pleasure to read as of late.And I'm not even kidding when I say that most of my favorite pieces were about them. I mean:“My dad first saw her at his cousin’s house—my mom was her friend—and was flustered by her beauty. Ask my dad and he’ll wax poetic about my mother’s cheekbones, her rich eyes, her long hair, how he needed to get to know her. My mom didn’t even know he was there.”#GOALS.“Nothing bad can happen to you if you’re with your mom. Your mom can stop a bullet from lodging in your heart. She can prop you up when you can’t. Your mom is your blood and bone before your body even knows how to make any.”Daughters showing love for their mothers is how my heart remains fulfilled.“In the fifth grade, I got my hair chopped off in an ill-advised pixie cut, some two feet of dark black hair sheared off me like a sheep. Mom gathered it all and stuffed it into a heavy-duty Ziploc bag. “What are you doing?” I asked her as she tucked the bag into her purse. “When you’re older,” she said, “you’re going to get married, and this we can use for hair extensions on your wedding day.” She put the hair in the deep-freezer in the garage and it’s still there; sometimes when I root around for Pizza Pockets I will instead pull out a bag filled with my DNA. My mother would like a wedding, please, and it is not optional.”This is so extra. I love it. “Papa ends most of his calls with me the way you might close a conversation with someone you want to menace. “Anyway,” he’ll say, “I’ll be here. Staring into the abyss.” Or, when I have given him good news, “The talented will rule and the rest will perish in the sea of mediocrity.” Or, when I have given him bad news, “I am sorry for everything that happens to you, as everything is my fault.” HE’S SOMETHING ELSE…“When he started watching The Wire he answered the phone with “What up?” or “Who dat?” or some other linguistic appropriation that does not actually appear in the show. If I don’t acknowledge this greeting (perhaps with a similarly enthusiastic, “It’s ya boy”), he will say it another two or three times. It’s important that you notice this good mood he is in, because it is fleeting.”Real talk, I want a whole book where Scaachi Koul gets to talk solely about her dad, please. 5/5 stars just for him. And so I loved how each essay ended with a snippet from one of her emails with her dad. I got to a point where I was looking forward to see what would be shared next at the end of each written piece.“None of this—the impatience, the frustration, the willingness to hold a grudge against an inanimate object—is new to me. He’s always been waiting for something to ruin his life. When I was little and would pretend to be a doctor and he my patient, he’d ask me surprisingly real questions about his hypertension and cholesterol, when all I wanted to do was “test his reflexes” by hitting him in the shin with a plastic mallet. He colours with Raisin but wants her to do something more “cerebral” with her talents. “No, don’t colour like that,” he says. “Colour in the lines. The lines! Well, if you’re going to do it that way, at least do some Cubist-inspired art. Show your inner angst. Show how angry you are at the establishment!” She frowns at him and tries to ignore his commands. “Yes,” he says. “Colour Dora’s face.”This is the quality content I'm here for.Also, I lived for this iconic moment when her dad was introduced to Scaachi's older (by thirteen years) boyfriend:“They shook hands. Papa led him into the kitchen, where all serious family matters tend to take place. He offered Hamhock tea. “You look good,” Papa said. “For someone your age.” Let me rephrase, this is not an iconic scene this is THE iconic scene. However, since I kind of disliked her boyfriend a lot, my enjoyment was lowered every time he was mentioned. (Which turned out to be quite a lot for a memoir...)But circling back to the positives, all of the pieces are entertaining, riveting and humorous, but some worked better for me than others. Like, the piece on body hair -which I'm still beyond grateful that someone finally wrote about in a book- remains one of my favorite essays.“I didn’t shave more of it off. I didn’t want James to know he had gotten to me, so I figured I’d wait until the summer, the way I did for my moustache and brows, so that everyone would just forget I ever had hair in the first place. In class, though, James noticed the bald patch on my forearm. He laughed. “Did you try shaving your arm because I told you that you were hairy?”James works in finance now. He lives in Boston. We are all eventually punished for our sins.”THIS GIRL. And last but not least, this crucial piece on social media and interaction:“Who do you even talk to on Twitter?” Papa asked me after I told him I had rejoined. “Who could be so important there?” I thought about my family’s traditional Kashmiri last name, how any other Kashmiri can point us out in a phone book and know where we’re from. This has, literally, happened: when I was still living at home, a recent immigrant looked up our listed number, called us, and asked if he could come over to talk to my parents and get some help integrating. Mom made him fried vangan and Papa offered him chai and I was perplexed that my otherwise very private, very protective parents let a complete stranger stroll into their home just because he came from the same region they did. But they were trying to find connection, to talk to someone who understood them. I will likely have to tell you, here, that vangan is eggplant, but online, I can find someone in mere seconds who already knows that. Our worlds become a little smaller, we feel closer, we feel less alone.”One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter is something I won't be forgetting anytime soon. Candid, outspoken, laugh-out-loud funny essays are the way to my heart. And I hope we'll get to see similar books released in the very near future because I crave more and more and more. 4.5/5 stars Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission! This review and more can be found on my blog.
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  • Esil
    February 7, 2017
    3.5 stars. One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter is an engaging collection of personal essays. The author is a young Canadian woman who's family is originally from India. She grew up in Calgary and lives in Toronto. Her personal essays deal with, amongst other topics, family, relationships, race, body image, hair, drinking, family weddings and her parents' reaction to her older white boyfriend. Her essays feel young, irreverent, angry and honest -- at times bordering on a bit to 3.5 stars. One Day We'll All Be Dead and None of This Will Matter is an engaging collection of personal essays. The author is a young Canadian woman who's family is originally from India. She grew up in Calgary and lives in Toronto. Her personal essays deal with, amongst other topics, family, relationships, race, body image, hair, drinking, family weddings and her parents' reaction to her older white boyfriend. Her essays feel young, irreverent, angry and honest -- at times bordering on a bit too much honesty for me. There is also plenty of humour and the odd swear word. Many times, Koul made me feel old, but I enjoyed the window into her world. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for an opportunity to read an advance copy.
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  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    February 12, 2017
    Perfect for fans of Lindy West, Roxane Gay, and Jenny Lawson. With the added commentary on skin color in India vs. Canada, I felt like I was gaining one more perspective on what it means to have brown skin and how that changes based on where you are (and her surprising excursions into privilege.) The parenting emails made me laugh, her compassion towards her parents was impressive in that she could see the humor while also being annoyed. I will definitely be recommending this to other readers wh Perfect for fans of Lindy West, Roxane Gay, and Jenny Lawson. With the added commentary on skin color in India vs. Canada, I felt like I was gaining one more perspective on what it means to have brown skin and how that changes based on where you are (and her surprising excursions into privilege.) The parenting emails made me laugh, her compassion towards her parents was impressive in that she could see the humor while also being annoyed. I will definitely be recommending this to other readers when it comes out.Thanks to the publisher who gave me early access via Edelweiss.
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  • Leonicka
    October 20, 2016
    Scaachi's voice is wholly unique. She is cringingly funny (in a good way, I swear) but I found myself tearing up quite often. This isn't a treatise on millennial Indian women or a manifesto on the first-gen immigrant story or some bullshit like that.She makes no attempts to tell a universal story and I so appreciate that. She just offers her own story and it is more than enough.
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  • Katie
    November 11, 2016
    I can't even begin to describe how much I loved this book. Everyone I know is going to get it for their birthday for the next five years. My dad will probably be a little confused at first but whatever.
  • Victoria
    February 15, 2017
    Honest review of ARC (Goodreads Giveaway): I hoped to like this book, but didn't anticipate just how much I would love it. I knew a bit about Scaachi Koul from some of her Buzzfeed essays, but didn't quite know what I was in for with this book. Yet, from the very first essay, I was emotionally hooked. Koul weaves a kind of intimacy through these essays that is sometimes absent in other memoir essay collections (sorry, Mindy Kaling and Ellen DeGeneres). Despite having had very different upbringin Honest review of ARC (Goodreads Giveaway): I hoped to like this book, but didn't anticipate just how much I would love it. I knew a bit about Scaachi Koul from some of her Buzzfeed essays, but didn't quite know what I was in for with this book. Yet, from the very first essay, I was emotionally hooked. Koul weaves a kind of intimacy through these essays that is sometimes absent in other memoir essay collections (sorry, Mindy Kaling and Ellen DeGeneres). Despite having had very different upbringings and experiences, I felt a sense of relief reading her essays-- someone else knows how I feel and what I worry about. It is this kernel of raw humanity at the centre of each essay that makes the collection so good. We may not all have been to an Indian wedding, but we all know what parental/family pressure feels like; we may not all have been cut out of a skirt with a stuck zipper in a fitting room, but we all know what feeling insecure about our bodies feels like. The title, depending on how you read it, has two contradictory meanings: one day ... none of this will matter / one day this will matter . Accordingly, Koul tells stories about her life that are seemingly small and ostensibly won't matter in the grand scheme of things, and yet the way she tells them and connects them to shared human experiences (pains, fears, desires, questions) suggests a hope that these small things do matter.
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  • Sam Farmer
    January 8, 2017
    This book is a MUST READ for 2017. Many parts personally resonated in my heart and others were insightful perspectives that I may have never known otherwise. Scaachi's voice is uniquely her own as is her story, addressing so many of the big issues that affect us today - privilege, race, gender - as well as family dynamics which is near and dear to all. I find myself wanting to read every word she has ever written. Funny, intelligent, and exceptionally truthful. You best believe I will be putting This book is a MUST READ for 2017. Many parts personally resonated in my heart and others were insightful perspectives that I may have never known otherwise. Scaachi's voice is uniquely her own as is her story, addressing so many of the big issues that affect us today - privilege, race, gender - as well as family dynamics which is near and dear to all. I find myself wanting to read every word she has ever written. Funny, intelligent, and exceptionally truthful. You best believe I will be putting this book in the hands of as many people as I possibly can.
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  • Emily Burns
    November 10, 2016
    This is an exceptionally well-written book of personal essays that are full of truth, hilarity, and beauty. I couldn't put it down.
  • Jennifer
    February 25, 2017
    I enjoyed this book of personal essays. At times the stories were both funny and cringe worthy. Some of the stories were very educational to me as a Caucasian woman. Although my best friend growing up for 5 years was an Indian girl (lost touch when we moved), there are many aspects of the culture I was unaware of. This book of essays was both enlightening and entertaining.I would highly recommend this book for all readers.
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  • Martha
    March 1, 2017
    A very honest collection of personal essays that touches on life for Scaachi Koul, in particular her experiences as a woman in Toronto, as a writer, and as a daughter of Indian immigrants. Koul shows us that race matters, gender matters, culture matters. Her stories acknowledged her own privilege and definitely helped me remember mine. But they're also a lot of fun, and her voice is fresh and blunt -- jut what you'd expect if you're familiar with her writing.I received a copy of this book from G A very honest collection of personal essays that touches on life for Scaachi Koul, in particular her experiences as a woman in Toronto, as a writer, and as a daughter of Indian immigrants. Koul shows us that race matters, gender matters, culture matters. Her stories acknowledged her own privilege and definitely helped me remember mine. But they're also a lot of fun, and her voice is fresh and blunt -- jut what you'd expect if you're familiar with her writing.I received a copy of this book from Goodreads.
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  • Jen
    March 2, 2017
    I received a free advance copy of this book from Penguin Random House Canada, via Goodreads Giveaways. The essays in this book are deftly written, equal parts funny and wistful, poetic and raw. Her voice is uniquely interesting, and doesn't try too hard to dive into the heavy-handed 'deeper meaning' foolishness you often see in memoirs and personal essays. Almost every story was a joy to read.
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  • Susan Feng
    March 12, 2017
    It's nearly 1 AM, but it felt important to get this down in the moment. It's been a while since I've finished a book in the middle of the night, and when I closed this book after reading the last few pages of acknowledgements, I cried. Heavy, hot, mysterious tears, my sinuses stinging.I can't pin point why I'm weeping. Maybe it's because I too grew up as the child of first-generation immigrant parents who worked hard, harder than they should've ever had to. Parents who loved me the best way they It's nearly 1 AM, but it felt important to get this down in the moment. It's been a while since I've finished a book in the middle of the night, and when I closed this book after reading the last few pages of acknowledgements, I cried. Heavy, hot, mysterious tears, my sinuses stinging.I can't pin point why I'm weeping. Maybe it's because I too grew up as the child of first-generation immigrant parents who worked hard, harder than they should've ever had to. Parents who loved me the best way they knew, but often clashed with this incomprehensible hybrid of a daughter they had as I grew older.Her experiences from her trips to India were at once not at all the same and exactly the same as mine the two times I've flown to China in the last sixteen years. The frustration of the stifling customs mingled with the melancholy of knowing you've lost parts of yourself, your history, your people's history.Beyond that, her explorations into what it is to be a woman in Western society: a woman with opinions, a woman who drags uncomfortable topics into the spotlight, or simply a woman who's had too much to drink. I've been lucky to not have experienced abuse or trauma, but I remember every injustice, professional or personal, that have happened to the women in my life. I remember all too well the time I half-carried my roofied friend out of a house party and took her to the emergency room.Scaachi's voice is unique, fierce, unapologetic. Her humour cuts like a knife, threaded deftly through the sometimes heavy topics of her essays. She achieved the rarity in writing, producing something that made me feel a striking connection, a clarity, a sense of recognition.I look forward to her future work, and I wish all the good things for her. And her parents + Hamhock + Raisin + Sylvia Plath The Cat.
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  • Kendra
    March 22, 2017
    Definitely worth a read if you're a fan of snarky memoirs by people not yet out past their thirties, or want to understand what it's like to grow up a child of immigrants in Canada.
  • Nikki Wilson
    March 17, 2017
    Love! The first few chapters had me laughing out loud (in public) - Scaachi's wit mixed honest storytelling introduces us to her family, her career, her love life, her friends & what it was like for her to grow up Indian in Canada ('land of ice & casual racism'). Tackling misadventures in clothing, drinking, family obligations alongside racism / shadism, sexism and rape culture. I am now following Scaachi on Twitterl (you should too). She is the kind of author whose words I read & I Love! The first few chapters had me laughing out loud (in public) - Scaachi's wit mixed honest storytelling introduces us to her family, her career, her love life, her friends & what it was like for her to grow up Indian in Canada ('land of ice & casual racism'). Tackling misadventures in clothing, drinking, family obligations alongside racism / shadism, sexism and rape culture. I am now following Scaachi on Twitterl (you should too). She is the kind of author whose words I read & I think, "Whoa, I wanna be friends with her." Fiercly funny & inspiring woman, you won't regret picking up this book!
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  • Lyndsey
    February 27, 2017
    I found the book was really amazing and touched on very interesting matters of life as a minority and about life as a woman. She touches on many controversial parts of society and voices her opinion and how her opinion was viewed by others. Overall I found the book to be touching and really a statement about society.
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  • Mita Williams
    February 24, 2017
    Scaachi's humour is so sharp she easily cuts close to the bone.This book is filled with personal stories and observations (many painfully familiar to those 1st gen Canadians with brown dads). While I enjoyed the book, personally I prefer her long-form reporting on BuzzFeed.
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  • Jillian
    March 21, 2017
    3.5. Standout essay to me was 'Tawi River, Elbow River'.
  • Bianca
    March 25, 2017
    Arc copy review to come
  • Lea
    March 25, 2017
    I felt this book in my soul.
  • Lauren Simmons
    March 19, 2017
    If you follow Scaachi on social media, aspects of this collection (tone, topics) will be familiar. I was struck by the author's capacity for deep, personal revelation alongside humorous episodes. Easy and fun to read but also notes that ring close and true, like the discussions of familial love, and rape.
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  • María José
    March 17, 2017
    ay mi corazoncito. me esperaba que fuera una buena colección de ensayos-- inteligentes, insightful, chistosos. pero lo que me ofreció Scaachi (siento que ahora puedo decirle así) fue mucho más que eso, y estoy muy feliz por haber esperado por esta colección, porque valió la pena.estos ensayos lo tienen todo: me hacían reír para que dos segundos después la cachetada emocional me doliera menos, líneas y párrafos destacados enteros, páginas y páginas de experiencias con las que me podía relacionar ay mi corazoncito. me esperaba que fuera una buena colección de ensayos-- inteligentes, insightful, chistosos. pero lo que me ofreció Scaachi (siento que ahora puedo decirle así) fue mucho más que eso, y estoy muy feliz por haber esperado por esta colección, porque valió la pena.estos ensayos lo tienen todo: me hacían reír para que dos segundos después la cachetada emocional me doliera menos, líneas y párrafos destacados enteros, páginas y páginas de experiencias con las que me podía relacionar 110%, y un nivel de escritura para besarse los dedos.me encantó. lo amé. lo quiero en forma análoga para releerlo y rayarlo y leer algunos de los ensayos en momentos específicos de mi vida, para recordar.
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  • Julia
    March 14, 2017
    This is a collection of essays written by an Indian woman, living in Canada. What I liked most about this book was that it gave me a way of seeing the world that I couldn't know about myself...what I mean, is, that, as a Caucasian woman in Canada, I don't know what it's like to live here with brown skin, and a family from another culture. The essays were not feel-good essays - they were raw, honest, sometimes hilarious, witty, and real. I like that. I liked the honesty of the book, and the way i This is a collection of essays written by an Indian woman, living in Canada. What I liked most about this book was that it gave me a way of seeing the world that I couldn't know about myself...what I mean, is, that, as a Caucasian woman in Canada, I don't know what it's like to live here with brown skin, and a family from another culture. The essays were not feel-good essays - they were raw, honest, sometimes hilarious, witty, and real. I like that. I liked the honesty of the book, and the way it didn't gloss over things. I can't know what it is like to live here as a woman of another colour and culture, but, thanks to this book, I think I have a little bit more understanding of what it's like. I enjoyed the way this collection of essays gave me that understanding, and a glimpse into another world.
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  • (a)lyss(a)
    March 6, 2017
    "I was learning how to be fun, sure, but the threat loomed: one of the guys here can take it away from you in a heartbeat and it'll be your fault."This book is phenomenal. Scaachi Koul shares what it's like to be a brown woman, a woman finding her way through college and life and whiteness. She shares essays about her identity of being a brown Asian woman, about being hairy, about being afraid of men and getting roofied, about feeling out of place in India but being foreign in the US, about her "I was learning how to be fun, sure, but the threat loomed: one of the guys here can take it away from you in a heartbeat and it'll be your fault."This book is phenomenal. Scaachi Koul shares what it's like to be a brown woman, a woman finding her way through college and life and whiteness. She shares essays about her identity of being a brown Asian woman, about being hairy, about being afraid of men and getting roofied, about feeling out of place in India but being foreign in the US, about her adorable father and everything in between.Koul has a distinct voice that's funny and honest. She speaks to her experience about being bullied online, struggles women face trying to share their voices in a public space, about her relationship with her parents and the wanting to stay in the house she grew up with while also living an independent life.This book is honest and funny and wonderful. It reminds us that we're not alone, that relationships are hard, and it's okay to talk about your insecurities. It's easy to relate to and Koul has a real talent for sharing her life.This is a book that everyone should read.
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  • Angela
    March 7, 2017
    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It discusses things that could have been downhearted, like body hair and overprotective parents, but the writer's outlook is positive and I feel a little happier about my own life after reading about Scacchi's life. Included are conversations and emails from her parents that are quite funny. However, beneath the humour there is a good amount of discussion on important topics. I also learned a bit about Indian culture which is awesome! This is one of the most enter I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It discusses things that could have been downhearted, like body hair and overprotective parents, but the writer's outlook is positive and I feel a little happier about my own life after reading about Scacchi's life. Included are conversations and emails from her parents that are quite funny. However, beneath the humour there is a good amount of discussion on important topics. I also learned a bit about Indian culture which is awesome! This is one of the most entertaining books of essays I have read.I received a copy of this book from the publisher via a Goodreads giveaway.
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  • Nimisha
    March 4, 2017
    This book resonated so much with me, I want to run down my street holding it in the air and yell about it to anyone who will listen. I have never felt so understood by someone I've never met before.
  • Noelle Walsh
    February 24, 2017
    This book is an excellent one! Scaachi makes no attempt to tell a universal story, but uses essays to tell her own story. As beautiful and humorous as it was well written, this book is worth reading.*won as a GoodReads Giveaway*
  • Ankita
    February 18, 2017
    Overall, I really liked this collection of essays, a lot of which hit home for this South Asian American woman. (I know the author's Canadian but so much of what she wrote about translated well to the SA immigrant experience in the US.) The author's honesty and willingness to write openly about seemingly taboo topics was refreshing. Her honesty about her relationship with her parents was especially moving. The only shortcomings were a few of the essays seemed a little long winded and in many of Overall, I really liked this collection of essays, a lot of which hit home for this South Asian American woman. (I know the author's Canadian but so much of what she wrote about translated well to the SA immigrant experience in the US.) The author's honesty and willingness to write openly about seemingly taboo topics was refreshing. Her honesty about her relationship with her parents was especially moving. The only shortcomings were a few of the essays seemed a little long winded and in many of the essays, the humor fell flat. Thanks to Netgalley for the advance copy!
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  • Cin
    February 18, 2017
    A wonderful book. I couldn't stop reading it since it's fun to read. I wish this book contains more funny and humorous essays.I received this book from the Goodreads First Reads program. Thank you for sending me this interesting book.
  • Kathleen
    February 19, 2017
    Got an ARC, so a longer review will be on the way!
  • October
    December 22, 2016
    Step aside Jenny Lawson, here's Scaachi! This collection of essays will have you laughing at the most awkward moments. (Like on a train full of disgruntled commuters or while stuffing your face with as much spaghetti you possibly can. My shirt. Anyways.) I feel like a better person for having read this. My skin has cleared. My vision is clearer. & probably, most importantly, I got to know Scaachi Koul a little bit more through her writings. P.s. Check out her twitter feed - amazing.
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