Dead Little Mean Girl
Quinn Littleton was a mean girl—a skinny blonde social terrorist in stilettos. She was everything Emma MacLaren hated. Until she died. A proud geek girl, Emma loves her quiet life on the outskirts, playing video games and staying off the radar. When her nightmare of a new stepsister moves into the bedroom next door, her world is turned upside down. Quinn is a queen bee with a nasty streak who destroys anyone who gets in her way. Teachers, football players, her fellow cheerleaders—no one is safe. Emma wants nothing more than to get this girl out of her life, but when Quinn dies suddenly, Emma realizes there was more to her stepsister than anyone ever realized. A meaningful and humorous exploration of teen stereotypes and grief, Dead Little Mean Girl examines the labels we put on people and what lies beyond if we're only willing to look closer.

Dead Little Mean Girl Details

TitleDead Little Mean Girl
Author
FormatHardcover
ReleaseMar 28th, 2017
PublisherHarlequin Teen
ISBN0373212410
ISBN-139780373212415
Number of pages304 pages
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult

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Dead Little Mean Girl Review

  • Stacee
    December 6, 2016
    3.5 starsThe cover caught my eye and the synopsis hooked me, so I pretty much read this as soon as I got approved.I really liked Emma. She's smart and nerdy and I loved her friends. Nikki is amazing and I would love to get arrested with her. Shawn was sweet {after a certain thing was over} and I enjoyed seeing his relationship with Emma. Quinn...well, she's quite a mean person, but she's more than just the mean girl. She's toxic to anyone she touches. I get that there are underlying reasons, but 3.5 starsThe cover caught my eye and the synopsis hooked me, so I pretty much read this as soon as I got approved.I really liked Emma. She's smart and nerdy and I loved her friends. Nikki is amazing and I would love to get arrested with her. Shawn was sweet {after a certain thing was over} and I enjoyed seeing his relationship with Emma. Quinn...well, she's quite a mean person, but she's more than just the mean girl. She's toxic to anyone she touches. I get that there are underlying reasons, but I certainly don't agree with the way anything Quinn did was handled.I liked the basis of the moms getting together and for the most part, they were awesome. My main complaint {besides everything Quinn related} was that there wasn't really a revelation. I was under the impression that there was a reason and while there was a slight explanation, I was left scratching my head rather than understanding. Perhaps that's the age difference from me to the target audience.Overall, it was a quick and mostly fun read. I'll definitely be looking for other books by the author.**Huge thanks to Harlequin Teen and NetGalley for providing the arc free of charge**
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  • Leah
    November 28, 2016
    ***I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review***SUMMARY: DEAD LITTLE MEAN GIRL starts at the end. Quinn Littleton, the aforementioned mean girl, is dead in her family's garage. Told from the point-of-view of her stepsister, Emma, we learn of all the ways in which Quinn manipulates, uses, and abuses everyone around her, and how those very people manage to survive Hurrican Quinn.------REVIEW: I love this book. I love it for the characters, for how well it's ***I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review***SUMMARY: DEAD LITTLE MEAN GIRL starts at the end. Quinn Littleton, the aforementioned mean girl, is dead in her family's garage. Told from the point-of-view of her stepsister, Emma, we learn of all the ways in which Quinn manipulates, uses, and abuses everyone around her, and how those very people manage to survive Hurrican Quinn.------REVIEW: I love this book. I love it for the characters, for how well it's written, but most of all for how real it is. There are people just like Quinn and her posse, and chances are, most of us have encountered them and come out mostly unscathed. (Either that or we are the Mean Person.) We build walls, means of self-defense, which is exactly what Emma and her family do in order to survive Quinn. I loved how Darrows wrote all the characters and their interactions with each other. There are so many different layers and complexities, depending on who you're with, and in each character, we received their anger, their love, their vulnerability, their guilt, and so much more.A noteworthy aspect of this novel is that the focus is not on the romance. Not that there's anything wrong with that, because lord knows I love me some romance. That's not to say there isn't a romance aspect! It's so simple and easy-going, with no drama. But don't come into this thinking it's basically a Cinderella retelling where Emma gets swept away and saved by the Prince. More than anything, this book is about siblings (or pseudo-siblings), family, divorce and how it affects children, the meshing of families when new relationships are formed, and the coping mechanisms we develop. It's may be rough to read in certain spots, as it pokes and prods and potentially reopens barely healed wounds, but it's absolutely worth the read.
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  • Max Baker
    December 8, 2016
    Thank you Netgalley for providing me a free review copy in exchange for an honest reviewI'm a huge fan of Hilary Monahan/Eva Darrows and I'm also a huge fan of books that deal with Mean Girls, so Dead Little Mean Girl has been on my radar since the cover reveal. After I got approved for this book, I could hardly contain myself. Monahan repeatedly said that she wanted to give agency and depth to the Mean Girl trope, to have this blonde mean cheerleader type have more depth than other stories have Thank you Netgalley for providing me a free review copy in exchange for an honest reviewI'm a huge fan of Hilary Monahan/Eva Darrows and I'm also a huge fan of books that deal with Mean Girls, so Dead Little Mean Girl has been on my radar since the cover reveal. After I got approved for this book, I could hardly contain myself. Monahan repeatedly said that she wanted to give agency and depth to the Mean Girl trope, to have this blonde mean cheerleader type have more depth than other stories have given her before. Did it work? Not really. For me, this was very much a book where the idea is better then the execution. Do I appreciate what Monahan tried to do? Of course, I just don't think it was done very well.Dead Little Mean Girl starts off with the main character, Emma, telling us that her stepsister, Quinn, is dead. A good two-thirds of the book is Emma telling the reader how Quinn came into her life after their moms started dating and what a nightmare it's been for her since. Quinn isn't nice, she's rude, loud, and just an asshole to everyone around her. And that's most of the book. Quinn being an asshole and Emma dealing with it. Then when Quinn dies, Emma is left feeling guilty for not being nicer to Quinn and has this long speech about how we shouldn't judge one another and slap a mean girl label on people instead of trying to understand her. She then says that we should treat people with kindness even when kindness is hardest to give. I'm sorry, but I call bullshit. The final third of this book rubbed me the wrong way to the point where I was physically uncomfortable with what Emma was doing. My problem with this book is that Monahan presents this theory that Mean Girls are mean, because they are hurt and scared and don't know how to respond to that and this lash out. That's fine, people do that and it needs to be explored, but I didn't believe that Quinn was one of those people. We're never in Quinn's head during this book. We have no idea what she's feeling, why she does the things she does; all we know about Quinn is filtered through Emma's interaction with her and what Emma sees and hears from others. Yes were given backstory to Quinn, her dad married a much younger woman, her mom's an enabler, she's taking the divorce hard, but she still spread rumors, showed Emma's love interest's penis to people, got a teacher fired, and outed a girl before she was ready. Maybe she did it because she was scared or angry or upset or whatever, but it almost felt like Emma was trying to excuse Quinn's behavior as the byproduct of a larger issue and not as an issue itself.The message here, that we should try to understand each other and be kind when it's hardest is admirable, but it's a two way street. It was clear from day one that Quinn had no plans on being nice, on being pleasant or respectable. She was a bitch and acted accordingly and I'm suppose to take a step back and think about how her life is hard and I should be kind, because she's going through a difficult time. No, fuck that. Having a shitty life and/or shitty experiences doesn't excuse the fact Quinn was a vicious, mean little shit and I don't think this book gets that. There's no excuse for Quinn's behavior, ever. And maybe that's not what Monahan was going for, but that's how it came across. Emma's grieving, she's sad she had a fight with Quinn right before she died and said horrible things, but Emma had been nothing but civil at Quinn, sometimes she was even nice, and Quinn through it in her face. Emma shouldn't have to grin and bear it, she should yell and scream and be fucking mad. She has a right to be upset as much as Quinn has a right to be damaged.And I'm not saying that Quinn herself wasn't damaged; I'm saying she made her choices and they weren't good. Was it a cry or help? Maybe. But, the book doesn't explore that as it should. Quinn was mean and no matter what shitty hand your dealt, being vicious shouldn't be the answer nor should it be written off. Yes Quinn has a story; she wasn't born mean, but she still had choices and she made hers. I can understand them, I can emphasize and pity them, but I don't have to like them and I sure as shit don't have to ignore or justify them. When it comes to people like Quinn, don't grin and bear it. Again, I like what Monahan tried to do, but in the end I don't think it did what she wanted it to do.
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  • Mehsi
    December 2, 2016
    I received this book from the publisher/author in exchange of an honest review.So this book starts off with a bang, death instantly. So we all know that the stepsister is going to die. We just don’t know how it happens.It was a very effective intro, as it kept me wondering when we would reach full circle (aka when we would get to the part where this death happened).I will try to write a review, but I am still quite wowed by this book, so it will be hard, so bear with me. :)I could connect in so I received this book from the publisher/author in exchange of an honest review.So this book starts off with a bang, death instantly. So we all know that the stepsister is going to die. We just don’t know how it happens.It was a very effective intro, as it kept me wondering when we would reach full circle (aka when we would get to the part where this death happened).I will try to write a review, but I am still quite wowed by this book, so it will be hard, so bear with me. :)I could connect in so many ways with the character, and the mean girl was written so realistic that it was all recognition for me. I also had a mean girl like that in my life. A girl who was angry, then when she needed people was friendly, only to go back into death mode fast. We kind of lived at the same place for reasons. Together with some other people. I won’t go into much details, but lets say it really hit home, this book. Sure, it took me a while to realise it (80%) but then everything just connected and I just could see the bigger picture even better. The later part was also so true, about the mean girl, that she was probably asking for help, that she just needed someone to tell her things would be OK. I am not sure if anyone could have helped the mean girl in my life (she was pretty deep into things), but the stepsister? Yes, someone might have helped her. Someone might have told her she was loved, showed it in different way than just buying things. It might have been a hard, long, tough road, but I can already imagine that she might turn out to be sweeter.Emma was just an amazing MC, I loved how she stayed true to who she was, didn’t let herself be bullied to be someone else. She could have done so many things, but she stayed true to who she was. Of course, she wasn’t happy, she wasn’t feeling good, and I can imagine that, I know the feeling all too well. I felt sad for her that she had to go through this, that it seems that no one was listening to her. Her mom tried her best, and Quinn mom as well, but especially Quinn’s mom just made it worse by spoiling Quinn further and further.I was also really proud of her at the ending, for what she realised then, and how she handled it. I did feel a bit angry that she felt guilty about Quinn’s death. You don’t need to feel guilty. It wasn’t your fault. I am glad her friends also tried to tell her this.The moms. I loved both of them, though I have to say I liked Emma’s mom the most. Quinn’s mom was too much, oh dear, my kid is doing something wrong, let me buy x and y expensive thing to make things better and make sure she will not do x and y again. Which in turn made things only so much worse.But I loved them together, they were pretty much different, not only in how they looked, but also in how their personalities were, but they fitted together so wonderful. I also loved how how they tried to not be too much love-dovey in front of the kids as they knew it was a change for both of them. It was really sweet of them.I so didn’t like Quinn’s dad. He was horrible. He cared more about his own things than his daughter. :\Emma’s friends were definitely fun, and I liked them all.What more? Well, the story was great, and it was a very engaging read and the author really did an amazing job on writing the characters. They were all so real, so wow.I would highly recommend this book to everyone. And sorry for the slightly chaotic review, I am still just so amazed at this book, and I am having trouble getting my feelings turned to words.Review first posted at https://twirlingbookprincess.com/
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  • Bee {Quite the Novel Idea}
    July 7, 2016
    The Awesome was, well... awesome so heeeeells yeah I want this one.
  • Christina (A Reader of Fictions)
    March 19, 2017
    Pages read: 25I don't like the voice much, and I hate that both the heroine and her mean girl stepsister to be assume that currently being with a girl makes someone a lesbian. Their moms hook up after divorces from men and both call them lesbians, which seems like potential bi erasure. Especially given another f/f scene in chapter two. It would be one thing if the hateful stuff here only came from the mean girl but it doesn't. I can't take it.
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  • Hayley
    February 2, 2017
    Looks like a meaningful read filled with humor and heart, will update this review when I read it.
  • Krutula
    March 23, 2017
    Sympathy for the Bully Dead Little Mean Girl gives us a story about two stepsisters - one a typical mean girl, Quinn, and the other a homely nerd, Emma, with the former having a mean streak a mile wide and a raging desire to ruin the latter's life. Three-fourths of the novel is about how Quinn makes life miserable for everyone around her, especially Emma - she is the kind of toxic evil that even the Devil would probably come to her for pointers. The book delivers this regular bullying fare with Sympathy for the Bully Dead Little Mean Girl gives us a story about two stepsisters - one a typical mean girl, Quinn, and the other a homely nerd, Emma, with the former having a mean streak a mile wide and a raging desire to ruin the latter's life. Three-fourths of the novel is about how Quinn makes life miserable for everyone around her, especially Emma - she is the kind of toxic evil that even the Devil would probably come to her for pointers. The book delivers this regular bullying fare with some intermittent slapstick humor in the form of Emma's narration, but you can't ignore the impulse to wish Quinn dead. And she does exactly that - die, I mean. And then Emma has a change of heart towards her now dead stepsister.Look, I get the intention with which the author tried to write this novel (as said in the acknowledgements)- she wanted to show that even mean girls deserve humanity and kindness. But when you have a 200+ page reason for hating Quinn, you can resolve that kind of vitriol in the last quarter of the book. Emma's grief towards the end was begun mainly because she realized she had wrongfully accused her and inadvertently caused her death - and looking back, she realizes she never tried to understand her sister or give her chances. But if you reading this book in a stretch (like I was) you remember with perfect clarity how Emma was kind to her in the beginning of the book, before she realizes the brand of toxic that Quinn was. This wasn't a simple case of a girl with a bad childhood or daddy issues. Even if we account for her young age, the fact of the matter is that you can't save people who don't want to be saved. (Thank you, The 100 for that gem). Sure, we can feel pity for them, but some people cannot be reformed - maybe they can be tamed at most. Quinn's bullying wasn't just petty; she openly sought to destroy lives. If her bullying had caused a death (which she could easily have), this narrative wouldn't have been about trying to humanize her. Which, I must clarify, the author doesn't do a good job of, either. What exactly was human about Quinn that she deserved more than the level of kindness that was afforded to her? She wasn't treated badly by people - on the contrary, people worshiped her despite her nastiness. I also get that teenage girls are demonized more easily than any other, but I can't put aside her homophobia, racism, fatphobia, bullying and entitlement to justify this brand of white feminism. Worse is the fact that Quinn never faces any consequence for her behaviour.So, you may wonder what I did like about this book? I liked the writing - the author builds a great narrative about the relationship between Emma and her mothers (I just wish they would have been called bisexual instead of lesbians), the wholesome friendship between Emma and her friends, and the build-up for Quinn. For once, a mean girl wasn't just a cookie cutter character - she had complexity, which the author was striving for, and achieved. Granted, the last quarter of the book sort of fell apart, but until then a good narrative was being built. The way Shawn consoled Emma at the end, making her understand that it wasn't her fault - that was a good thing, because I couldn't take Emma blaming herself for it. It also portrays how death makes a person kinder in some one eyes, but as a person who once stood at a funeral for someone I loathed and tried to shed a tear out of decency, I cannot say I condone the ending of the book. It might bring some peace to others, or inspire to 'kill it with kindness' but it just wasn't doing it for me. Trigger warning for harmful racism, homophobic slurs and body shaming in the book.Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review from Harlequin Teen, via Netgalley.
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  • Cassandra
    December 4, 2016
    Review copy received from Netgalley.I'm turning into such a Hillary Monahan/Eva Darrows fangirl, aren't I? Dead Little Mean Girl has been my guilt-read for a few nights now, and I'm sad to have reached its conclusion. Like all of Eva's books, it is rich in interesting friendships. People care about each other here, and not just in the context of 'I'd like to bonk you some day.' Having said that, Dead Little Mean Girl does wear its queer heart like a banner of pride. The MC's moms are fantastic b Review copy received from Netgalley.I'm turning into such a Hillary Monahan/Eva Darrows fangirl, aren't I? Dead Little Mean Girl has been my guilt-read for a few nights now, and I'm sad to have reached its conclusion. Like all of Eva's books, it is rich in interesting friendships. People care about each other here, and not just in the context of 'I'd like to bonk you some day.' Having said that, Dead Little Mean Girl does wear its queer heart like a banner of pride. The MC's moms are fantastic bi-women who have emerged from marriages to men and ... have no issue with that. There's no agonizing about whether this is a transitory thing, a bounce-back from divorces. The moms were with men and now they're with each other. That's that.Oh, god. What was I saying?Anyway, in terms of the book and the main character and the things that are actually happening on page, Dead Little Mean Girl has a beautifully complex MC who deals with beautifully complex teenage issues, including falling for the school hottie, a fondness for Supernatural, and dealing with bullying. Heartfelt, the book effortlessly swings from hilarious adolescent antics to ... darker stuff. And some of the material that DLMG tackles is, well, dark indeed. Wince-inducing subjects that are nonetheless a part of modern life. My only complaint? I spent so much time invested in the central cast's life that I found myself forgetting that the 'Mean Girl' of the title had, in fact, died. When her demise came, I was surprised by it and then surprised by its abruptness. Without giving too much away, it isn't a dramatic death. It simply -is- and the book ties itself up together neatly very shortly after. I'd like to have lingered longer on the repercussions of the death, how it affects the cast, etc. But everyone has teeny, tiny quiggles about everything.TLDR: Dead Little Mean Girl is lovely. Get hyped. u-u
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  • Aurora
    March 6, 2017
    Immediately from the first page to the last, I was engaged with the adorable geeky, Emma. As a fellow nerd, I related to her in a lot of ways, and she felt very familiar to me like a friend I’d known for years. Darrows does a fantastic job of getting her voice just right enough to sound “geeky” (the Doctor Who references stole my heart) and also reasonable. Emma was too damn likeable, and she articulates her opinions with an ease that most adults should be jealous of and take note.With the story Immediately from the first page to the last, I was engaged with the adorable geeky, Emma. As a fellow nerd, I related to her in a lot of ways, and she felt very familiar to me like a friend I’d known for years. Darrows does a fantastic job of getting her voice just right enough to sound “geeky” (the Doctor Who references stole my heart) and also reasonable. Emma was too damn likeable, and she articulates her opinions with an ease that most adults should be jealous of and take note.With the story opening up to Quinn’s death, it works its’ way backwards to the beginning of their relationship. Her death serves as a lens to view all these past events with some bias. Not that Emma shies away from stating her dislike, and Quinn’s antics are a high level of mean that can’t be ignored. Still, it’s interesting to witness all of Quinn’s destruction unfold with the foreknowledge of her death. Each incident is taut with the expectation of impeding doom. The real cause of Quinn’s death is a mystery that I won’t spoil though, so scram! I will say that this book is not about Quinn’s death, but rather her life in relation to Emma.Please read my full review on my blog: https://littlegreatreads.wordpress.co...
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  • Jenn
    January 11, 2017
    This book surprised me and is one of my favorites of the year. It's described by its author as Heathers meets Mean Girls, but I didn't think so. It's so much better than either of those two (for the record: I am not a fan of either film). There's a lot going on here, and while I'm sure some will try to say it's tokenism or whatever, I don't agree. The characters are relatable, their sexual orientation, race, weight, etc, are all reflective of real people in society and their experiences. These c This book surprised me and is one of my favorites of the year. It's described by its author as Heathers meets Mean Girls, but I didn't think so. It's so much better than either of those two (for the record: I am not a fan of either film). There's a lot going on here, and while I'm sure some will try to say it's tokenism or whatever, I don't agree. The characters are relatable, their sexual orientation, race, weight, etc, are all reflective of real people in society and their experiences. These characters just happen to have one of those things as a part of who they are. There isn't any agenda pushing here or anything like that. Was there a preachy moment? Yup. But it didn't feel like an out of place moment, just one that went on a little too long - and if you missed it, the author's note serves as a brick to the head to make sure you get it somehow. I'll be honest - I wasn't sure what to expect from this book. But Emma is a wonderful narrator; her sarcasm and snark was totally on point and some of the best writing of a modern teenager I've seen. She's got morals and feelings and she stands up for what's right, and if her voice is drowned out she at least knows that she tried. She's not a coward. And the bully of the story is her stepsister. It isn't some random kid from school. It's family. And that's something so often overlooked in the awareness against bullies that many times the bully in someone's life is a family member and there is no easy fix, if there's a fix at all. I wish the author had mentioned that in her note, but she was trying to go in a different direction with it, and I respect that. Still, it's worth a mention because maybe there's someone out there who may find refuge in Emma's sarcasm and wit from their own familial bully.
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  • Beccanox
    January 1, 2017
    Even though it started out with a death, the first 50 pages made me feel this was going to be a fun, fluffy read that I would recommend for light tone and fast finishing. 3/4 of the way through, however, the story took a very serious turn towards the emo-dramatic that was completely out of sync with the rest of the story. It could be said that death makes us all reflective, but the narrator's voice changed so completely that it was jarring and took me out of the flow. I think this book was attem Even though it started out with a death, the first 50 pages made me feel this was going to be a fun, fluffy read that I would recommend for light tone and fast finishing. 3/4 of the way through, however, the story took a very serious turn towards the emo-dramatic that was completely out of sync with the rest of the story. It could be said that death makes us all reflective, but the narrator's voice changed so completely that it was jarring and took me out of the flow. I think this book was attempting something admirable -- drawing attention through caricature to the risks of leaving anger undealt with, the dangers of casual neglect, and the importance of strong boundaries -- but at the end of the story it didn't seem fair or realistic to have the teen protagonist shoulder that burden, and only after the antagonist was dead. I applaud the author's positive treatment of different sexual orientations and a diverse cast of characters, most of whom didn't need to justify or defend their choices of partner. Any homophobic remarks were presented as negative behavior from wholly unlikeable characters. There were quirky moments and some witty dialogue notes, it was a book I read quickly and enjoyed about 40% of, but it left a poor taste in my mouth once finished. I'd recommend it to people interested in contemporary stories with diversity, with the reservation that it gets maudlin toward the end. I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a fair review.
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  • Tatiana James
    December 5, 2016
    Rating: 4 out of 5 starsRecommendation: Yes!Disclosure: I received a digital ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Publication Date: March 28, 2017 . No spoilers.Dead Little Mean Girl is hysterical, heartfelt, and genuine. Eva Darrows must of dissected a teenage girl's brain because I have never related to main character like I did with Emma. Quinn was the quintessential mean girl to the T, learning about Quinn made me feel terrible about being so quick to judge people. The family Rating: 4 out of 5 starsRecommendation: Yes!Disclosure: I received a digital ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Publication Date: March 28, 2017 . No spoilers.Dead Little Mean Girl is hysterical, heartfelt, and genuine. Eva Darrows must of dissected a teenage girl's brain because I have never related to main character like I did with Emma. Quinn was the quintessential mean girl to the T, learning about Quinn made me feel terrible about being so quick to judge people. The family dynamic in this was genuine and so very honest.Quinn was the quintessential mean girl with the racism, homophobia, and full of privilege. With this in mind I fully went into this preparing to never sympathize with this girl and I was not let down. Although Quinn had her moments and a sad upbringing none of it was an excuse for how awful she acted towards everyone including her own mother. Nevertheless Quinn was a tragic character who ultimately ruined herself.Although this novel was short it was chock full of nerdy goodness. Emma is one of the best nerds I've ever read about in fiction period. Emma is wonderful character who struggles with everything this novel throws at her but she still manages to stay true to herself and have a heart of gold and beautiful outlook on life.I thought this book was just wonderful, it dealt with grief so well especially concerning grief about person who wasn't exactly in an angel in life.
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  • Angela Jones-Cuéllar
    December 12, 2016
    pooled ink Reviews: Wow. Seriously?? Quinn is just...I have to hold tightly onto the fact that she's a fictional character or risk losing my mind because gahhhhhh...but it really is so true and something we don't tend to think about. I honestly try my best to remember that there is always a reason. It's probably one of the hardest things to do when someone is being hurtful but I do believe that no one is born evil, and that no matter how horrible they are that there is at least a reason for it. pooled ink Reviews: Wow. Seriously?? Quinn is just...I have to hold tightly onto the fact that she's a fictional character or risk losing my mind because gahhhhhh...but it really is so true and something we don't tend to think about. I honestly try my best to remember that there is always a reason. It's probably one of the hardest things to do when someone is being hurtful but I do believe that no one is born evil, and that no matter how horrible they are that there is at least a reason for it. Does that reason excuse them? Hell no. But it's still very important to understand and try to give people what they need even when they deserve it the least. Overall this was a quirky, amusing, and oddly insightful story. Emma's voice came across as sharp and almost witty. This book really takes "quiet nerd" and "mean queen" to a whole entirely new level. Contemporary, quirky, and dark humored, Dead Little Mean Girl speaks volumes to teens and the world that swells around them.Read my FULL review here: https://pooledink.com/2016/12/13/dead...
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  • Mauzi
    December 8, 2016
    I wasn't sure what to expect when I started reading this (I'd forgotten the blurb! Fail), but whatever my expectations might have been, this blew them out of the water. While a little rough in places, the overall arc was really well written. The characters came across as real - Emma was a great character, so having the whole book in first person really worked, and Quinn was a perfect mean girl. Some of her actions seem so over the top crazy that you wonder how we're ever meant to be sympathetic I wasn't sure what to expect when I started reading this (I'd forgotten the blurb! Fail), but whatever my expectations might have been, this blew them out of the water. While a little rough in places, the overall arc was really well written. The characters came across as real - Emma was a great character, so having the whole book in first person really worked, and Quinn was a perfect mean girl. Some of her actions seem so over the top crazy that you wonder how we're ever meant to be sympathetic towards her - but that's the whole point of this novel. I did think the ending seemed a little rushed, but it was a solid read.
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  • Tina
    January 10, 2017
    I will add this to my collection even though I didn't love it.
  • Sarah
    December 28, 2016
    Read my review here: https://sarahsbookthoughts.wordpress....
  • Aliza
    February 1, 2017
    Sounds intriguing, will update this review when I read it.
  • TJ Burns
    December 12, 2016
    I received a copy of this book from Harlequin Teen via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • Jess
    April 25, 2016
    After The Awesome, she's basically an insta-buy author for me.
  • Kira Brighton
    December 21, 2016
    (Showcased in "Waiting On" Wednesday: Dead Little Mean Girl)
  • Kelly Hager
    March 21, 2017
    From almost the instant that Quinn and Emma met, they hated each other. Their moms are dating, and that would be hard enough (it is, presumably, the first lesbian relationship for both) but it's made worse by the fact that Quinn is a mean girl. (Like Heather Chandler mean, the kind of girl who will destroy others for fun and then forget about it because she doesn't even care enough to remember their names or why she wanted to hurt them in the first place.) And then, as the title implies, she die From almost the instant that Quinn and Emma met, they hated each other. Their moms are dating, and that would be hard enough (it is, presumably, the first lesbian relationship for both) but it's made worse by the fact that Quinn is a mean girl. (Like Heather Chandler mean, the kind of girl who will destroy others for fun and then forget about it because she doesn't even care enough to remember their names or why she wanted to hurt them in the first place.) And then, as the title implies, she dies. I was expecting a guilty pleasure, but it ended up being much more than that. Quinn is, by any standard, a horrible person. But she's also so young and she never got a chance to be better. This story is a tragedy, even though it's one with a pretty stellar moral. It's almost the counter to Heathers and a rebuke to the delight we feel in seeing awful people get their comeuppance. They're kids, and they deserve a chance to grow up and improve.
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  • Ms.Kim
    November 29, 2016
    A more complex book than one would predict. I appreciated how the author turned the mean girl trope on its head, and while not condoning her bullying, humanized her. Definitely the upper end of the YA age spectrum.
  • Wendy
    March 27, 2017
    So, this book is not likely to win awards. But it is an intriguing quick read with great likeable and unlikeable characters. Quinn may not seem to be believable, but speaking from my experiences as a social worker, this character does exist in the wild, my friends. I really like Darrows writing style. Her YA voice is authentic, not forced like many adult authors writing for teens. The humor is sarcastic, which fits with the characterizations. I didn't feel like Emma fell victim to the nerd girl So, this book is not likely to win awards. But it is an intriguing quick read with great likeable and unlikeable characters. Quinn may not seem to be believable, but speaking from my experiences as a social worker, this character does exist in the wild, my friends. I really like Darrows writing style. Her YA voice is authentic, not forced like many adult authors writing for teens. The humor is sarcastic, which fits with the characterizations. I didn't feel like Emma fell victim to the nerd girl trope. Quinn did read similar to other YA mean girls; however, what makes this story stand out is how the author subtlety humanizes Quinn. Oh, you'll still hate her damn guts. But you might feel a bit guilty about it. Which is kinda how it works out irl sometimes. People have their shite, and it makes them deplorable. And even though we know about their issues and sympathize/empathize, we still detest them. Cause we all want to just yell at them, "Just get over yourself, dammit. Deal with your shit and move the eff on!" But it's not always that easy, right?Anyway, like I said, a great quick read, making this an excellent choice for reluctant readers. For that reason, I give it a solid 4/5 stars.
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